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Keep Roots Live Music Radio On Air

Original music Nottingham and Derby
  • Hello we need a little help to keep our station running.

Roots Live Music Radio is a Radio Station that only plays original music by the Independent musicians off Nottingham and Derbyshire it doesn’t generate any money of it’s own and has been funded buy myself Chris Barlow and with the current situation over the last few months Income has been a problem 

So we are looking to try raise some funds to catch up on some payments we are behind on in order to keep the radio playing 

If you cant help with a donation how about helping us share and join us to raise fund any help would be amazing

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Myles Knight New Track Reggae!Reggae? Funtime

Myles Knight has a new track out and we at Roots Live Music are pushing the idea that the best way to support our amazing original artists and help the music scene is to buy the tracks to download that way the artist get the cash to write more stuff.


For a mere £0.59 you can own some original art and bask in the knowledge you have supported and made a real difference and even if you only buy one track a week 4 or 5 tracks a month it’s still less then a coffee at Starbucks

Buy Now Click Image

Myles Knight is a Nottingham born Singer/Songwriter, who has been described as a ‘Quick Witted’ and a ‘Stellar’ Songwriter with a ‘Distinctive Tone’. Myles Knight, occasionally accompanied by his band, provides a fusion of Indie Rock vibes with Blues undertones.

You can also Catch his songs and other local artists on Nottingham & Derby original music Radio station

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Lawrence County The Frailty of Humans

Lawrence County

“The Frailty of Humans – Lawrence County This is the first album release under the new band name from who once were DH Lawrence & The Vaudeville Skiffle Show.

This album takes a big shift in the musical direction of this bunch of guys and gals from the Bagthorpe Delta. There’s not a washboard in sight! Instead, the band have gone for a earthy, true-grit Americana sound with electric guitar an full tremolo mode and plenty of mountain-style fiddle.

The songs are carried with great care by drum (Bob Carlisle) and bass (Pete Heron) who provide a secure and gripping rhythm in every track.

Although obviously inspired by the Americana and alt-country sound, Lawrence County write songs about England (except for Bye Bye Americae which is definitely about America!).

They use Americana as a vehicle for telling stories about North Nottinghamshire, and the album is rich with local folklore.

12 of the 13 songs are original, with traditional English folk song Lucy Wan receiving a complete Lawrence County make-over – hard core folkies will no doubt be upset with this! The rest of the songs take us on a journey full of highs and lows, mixing rocking country tracks (They’re All There, I Don’t Sing County Anymore), with lonesome, pitiful ballads (Lights Go Out, By The Briar).

The fiddle and accordion are delivered skilfully by talented multi-instrumentalist Martin Gallimore. Lawrence County frontmen and songwriters Al Rate and Bill Kerry III are joined by local lasses Charlotte Pynegar and Marianne ‘Maz’ Clarke, who provide a contrast of backing vocals ranging from sweet and pure to proper gritty country. Lawrence County were lucky enough to have some incredible session players contribute to this album, namely Kristen Horner on cello, and George French on Trumpet.

These really add to the class of the tracks that they play on. Local music has never been so rich with talent, and this album is a ‘must listen’ to give us even more love for what the best of Nottingham has to offer.”

Lawrence County feature often on our radio station pushing Original music

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Badge sales go towards funding original music!

Original music Nottingham and Derby

Over the last 5 years Roots Live Music have been promoting original music in and around Nottingham and Derby in a few different ways, such as weekly open mics & weekend festivals and even created our own radio station that only plays original songs by our local artists from the two great cities…. To run a station is no easy thing it takes a great deal of time and indeed Money.

The station itself doesn’t generate an income so we have over the years funded it from the revenue of the open mics we hosted, but due to us currently not running a night we decided to start a new venture to help us fund it which found us making badges that musicians & Bands use to promote themselves this has been a great way for us to still keep the radio running

The Badges at the moment are two different sizes 25mm and 32mm we offer free Delivery on all orders so for £23 you can get 100 badges delivered to your door all in the knowledge its helping independent original music

We also do Stickers they are 60mm round which are £12.99 for 100

We have lots of plans to develop the station and promotion of original independent music so hopefully this can give us the funds that are so important to our mission

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The one thing you have to understand to get more gigs

Not all gigs are created equal: how to get the right gig for you

So you want to play more gigs.

It seems like other artists you know are performing all the time, so surely there must be a secret formula to getting gigs. That, or all the other musicians up on stage are friends with the venue owner or have a manager getting the gigs for them, right?

Maybe. But nine times out of ten the singer up there on stage has no insider information, no manager, and no friendship with the venue owner whatsoever.

So the burning question is….what is the Secret Formula to booking gigs?

I could reel off a few quick bullet points to whet your appetite, but to be honest that wouldn’t help you very much and here’s why: if you came up to me tomorrow and asked me how to get gigs, the first thing I’d say is, “What type of gig do you want?”

You see, not all gigs are created equal. Some gigs will pay well but won’t help you build a following; some gigs will pay next to nothing but will be massive fan builders; and some gigs… well they don’t get you fans or money but can still be valuable if used properly.

Confused?  I don’t blame you.

You see, before you can get gigs you need to understand the type of gigs that are out there and what each one can do for you. Once you understand this, it makes going after gigs a whole lot easier because you can look for a gig that is going to help you with your business (yes, you are a business) and is suitable for where you’re at in this phase of your career.

Have a look at the Gig Matrix below. These are examples of just some of the types of gigs, placed into a matrix that works on a scale of high versus low pay and high versus low fan building.

Note: This works for any musical genre; you just have to rename the gig slightly. For example, the musical theatre  equivalent of an ‘Open Mic Night’ is doing a community theatre show for free.

Bear in mind that this is not an exact science. The music industry is highly unregulated and I know that some musicians have done very well with ‘low pay/low fans’ gigs like busking if they go on a regular basis, however this is not always the case. To make things even clearer, let’s take a look at each of the areas of the Gig Matrix and find out what the benefits of each category can be for you.

Low Pay/ Low Fan Gigs

If after looking at the Matrix you thought that you would scratch Low Pay/ Low Fan gigs off your list straight away… well, think again. Every gig in the Matrix has its purpose and each is more accessible to you depending on what stage you are at in your music career.

For example, busking and open mic nights are a great way to test out new material or to gain performance practice when you are just starting out, and they are the easiest gigs to obtain; you can busk in most places by obtaining a simple busking licence and open mic nights take pretty much anyone.

In fact, I personally use both of these types of  gigs for this very purpose.  I’m currently working on some new folk material and am playing guitar for the first time (I’m usually a jazz performer and play piano and sing) so when I’ve got my material ready, I’ll hit up an open mic night to take my new songs and skills for a test drive.

Similarly, if you are in musical theatre, the best way to grow your resume is by doing free community shows. You’ll meet people in the industry and can work on your performance skills while you hunt around for new opportunities.

High Pay/ Low Fan Gigs

On the flip side of the Matrix  there are High Pay/ Low Fan gigs. These are what I call ‘Bread and Butter’ gigs because basically, they pay the rent. For contemporary singers, these might be bar/ club cover gigs where the venue pays you to play music their clientele will like, which usually means well known covers.

For me as a jazz musician, these are corporate gigs at some stuffy legal firm’s cocktail client night and I’m there to provide background music and look pretty. Yep seriously. Why else would they hire a band if they just want background music? It’s all for show. This is definitely not the place to pull out my massive banner, set up my merch stand complete with flashing lights and plug my CDs at the end of every set. You’ll be lucky if you get to hand out a few business cards during the break and get a quick thank you from the head honcho.

😉

Use these gigs to fund the Low Pay/High Fan building gigs that we’ll have a look at next… and make the most of the free canapés while you’re there. 

Note: Some musos only want these types of gigs. This is when it’s not so much about building a name for themselves than it is making money as a musician without having to leave their local area (Which is totally fine by the way. I know plenty of very good musicians who make their living this way) — but for those of you who want to make a mark, raise your profile, and reach for what can happen when you do start becoming known (i.e. a higher charge rate, better gigs, a deeper connection with fans, getting your message out there, and all the possibilities that come with being a person of interest) then read on.

Low Pay/ High Fan Gigs

I love/ hate these gigs. I know they are going to be good for my profile but I also know I’m going to run at a loss and as someone who relies solely on income derived from music, the costs involved can bite.

Many support gigs with better known artists will fall under this category (initially at least.) As anything in the music industry, there will be exceptions but when you have no fans apart from your rent-a-crowd mates then you don’t really have much value (in terms of business dollars) to add to a gig and the opportunity to perform with a band that does pull a crowd is a good opportunity for you, because it means you get to play for fans of a similar sounding band. If they like that band, then they may become your fan too. However, it’s not such a good deal for the venue or the band with the bigger name.

The reason is because these type of gigs usually operate on a pay by door sales basis. If you have no fans then your ability to help with the door sales intake is going to be minimal and therefore you shouldn’t expect to be paid for something you didn’t provide. The catch here however, is this: if you are a singer who uses an accompanist or session musicians in your band, then you still have to pay your musicians and you will have to fork out of your own pocket to pay them. It is easier if you have a band dedicated to doing any gig they can to ‘break in’ but for singers, this is frequently not the case.

The good news is that if you make the most of these gigs, you should start building fans from the first gig and it does get easier. That, or you can do a heap of advertising to get people through the door… but that is a topic for another blog post.

The bad news is that every time you want to break into a new market (location) you will have to repeat the support gig process, unless of course you have a major radio hit and venues are clambering over each other to book you… and we all know this is definitely not the norm.

However, playing support gigs is the fastest way to go from zero to fans and get you one step closer to the juicy gigs we’ll have a look at next.

High Fans/ High Pay Gigs

Ah yes, now we reach the realm of the Rich and Somewhat Famous and I can hear you thinking ‘Now we’re talking. Ok just tell me how to get heaps of these gigs, really well paying and in front of heaps of fans.’

My answer? “Patience, Grasshopper. They are not YOUR fans… yet.”

I’m not saying this to hold you back by any means because on average, festivals and promoted shows with advertising money behind them are hands-down the best way to get your name out there as an artist. The gig in itself would be enough, however most Festivals are accompanied by advertising money to spread your name further and have media salivating over the opportunity to get you on their interview list. Yes these are the best gigs to get, but they are also by far the most competitive.

Festivals are expensive to put on and so the Festival Promoter needs to ensure they will attract an excellent turnout each year. They do this by booking artists that they know will draw a crowd, which means that you need to be doing pretty well and have a solid following  to get one of these gigs (that, or be good friends with whoever is in charge.)

Don’t worry, there’s a catch to Festivals which is your secret way in. Create a list of the Festivals that support your type of music in your local area (and beyond if you can afford the travel costs). Most bigger Festivals don’t even accept artist applications so scratch those off initially. Your best bet is to target smaller festivals and then build up from there.

Keep an eye out for contests to play at bigger Festivals but realise the competition is going to be fierce. Some Festivals do offer busking opportunities which you can snap up if you perform solo and acoustic, then make the most of it; get your banner out, play loud and promote, promote, promote!

The other type of show that can sit either under this category in the Gig Matrix or under the Low Pay/Low Fans category is a show that you put on yourself. You hire a venue or agree to a split of the door sales and then it’s your job to book the support acts and get people through the door (this is where that rent-a-crowd friend base comes in handy).

These gigs are great for a reason to promote yourself in the local media and can be decent earners if your door numbers are solid. Do a good job and your rent-a-crowd might actually become true fans and bring more friends along next time.

So let’s go back to the start and revisit our original question: how to get gigs. Now that you can have a think about the type of gig that you want, doesn’t that make it easier to know where to start looking?

My advice is to pick the gig according to what your needs are as an artist. If you are just starting out, go for the Low Pay/Low Fan gigs where you can get some performance practice singing in front of a crowd. That way, if you stuff up, it’s not going to be such a big deal. If you’re past this stage, then have a look at the bands gigging in your local area that sound similar to you and reach out for a support gig.

Whatever the stage you are at in your music career, go for the gig that will benefit you the most… and once you have it, make the most of it.